Grand Canyon broadcasts tweet promoting basketball over academics

Grand Canyon has been fighting the stigma surrounding for-profit colleges for years, and broadcasting a student’s tweet about choosing to attend a basketball game instead of studying for finals won’t help that cause.

During the YouTube broadcast of Saturday’s game against UIC, the tweet scrolled across the feed’s bottom line, reading, “Why study for finals when you can go to a game?? #lopesup.”

Why study for finals when you can go to a game?? #lopesup — @tabithaashli

The tweet was initially posted during on Wednesday when Grand Canyon hosted San Diego State. Evidently, although the Antelopes have a terrific fan base and home court environment, their fans do not produce enough tweets to have fresh content scrolling across the screen for an entire two-hour broadcast.

As a result, this tweet made its way onto the feed several times.

Thanks to the context of that tweet, this innocent tweet about DeWayne Russell, the nation’s second-leading scorer, becomes infinitely funnier.

“All I want for Christmas is for DeWayne Russell to never graduate #lopesrising” — @ConnorGreenaw

Here’s one more of a few tweets and Instagram posts regarding finals that made the broadcast.

We both have multiple papers due tomorrow night…but we needed a break, and decided to go to the game instead #golopes — @samrosvold

While there’s nothing wrong about a student choosing to prioritize a basketball game over studying (although you may not want to publicize that on social media), it’s pretty surprising and backwards to see Grand Canyon as an institution of higher education promote that decision.

So to all you people who think student-athletes should be paid because their priorities differ from regular students’, you have now been proven wrong. Regular students care about athletics more than academics, too.

Grand Canyon is the only for-profit institution in Division I athletics. The school hoped to return to non-profit status because of the “stigma” surrounding for-profit colleges, but its regional accreditor, the Higher Learning Commission, rejected the plan in March.

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